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Dr. Sheri's Blog

CCSS

How to Map Out a Project

As a student, a mom, and a teacher, I've experienced many late nights spent cramming to get a project completed and turned in on time. Unfortunately, for individuals with executive function deficits, planning can be an area of great weakness. This lack of planning can result in leaving things to the last minute, or not getting started with a project at all because it just seems too overwhelming.

Project mapping is a method whereby sticky notes are used to identify the different components of a project.

So What's the Big Debate About the Common Core?

A couple of weeks ago a good friend posted a picture of amath problemon Facebook that was originally posted by the Australian Tea Party and reputed to be an example of a Common Core (CCSS) lesson. I was intrigued by the post (I admit that I couldn't make sense of the math problem), partly because I wasn't aware that Australia had adopted the US Common Core State Standards,  and partly because in all my experience with the CCSS I had never experienced or seen anything like the problem that was being shown.

Master Binder System for Individuals with EF Deficits

“My child was not having any success as she searched for an important paper that needed to be signed by me and submitted to the school office.  I opened her backpack only to find that it looked like a bomb went off inside!  There was so much stuff in there, including paperwork that should have been shared with parents at home as well as assignments that should have been turned in at school. Comments from some of her teachers made sense now—‘She isn’t turning in any homework’.  I know she is doing the work at home, because she shows it to me after she finishes.

Project Planning for people with EF deficits

Check out this email I received from my co-author, Carol Burmeister:

Hi Dr. Sheri,
 
I wanted to share a personal experience I had with my grandson last week.  I was helping him with his homework, which included preparing for a presentation on Ronald Reagan that he was expected to share in school on Friday.  He did research on his topic online and synthesized the information so that he could develop a presentation that included his findings and supporting evidence.  He made strategic use of digital media and visual displays to enhance understanding of his material.

So, what's the big deal about Executive Function?

When I think of Executive Function (EF) skills, I picture those movies in which a high-powered executive is followed around by an executive assistant who takes care of all the details. "Ma'am, your 9:00 is waiting in room B. You're conference call will begin at 9:45 and I'll make sure everyone is ready and waiting on the line. Tomorrow is Valentine's Day; I ordered a gift to be delivered to your husband at work and a flower arrangement to be delivered to your mother. I also wrote a thank you note to your mother-in-law for her birthday gift and sent that in the mail.

Building Positive School Climate Part III

In my last two blogs I've reviewed the first two guiding principles included in the USDE document,Guiding Principles: A Resource Guide for Improving School Climate and Discipline(2014). If you haven't had a chance to check out my first two blogs on the first two guiding principles, please do so. Today I'm trying something different (yet again). I've recorded a short video which can be viewed by clicking below. If you are viewing from an educational facility that blocks YouTube, click

Building Positive School Climate, Part II

I'm trying something new for my blog today. I'm going to focus on the second of the three guiding principles that are included in the USDE resource guide and I've developed a Prezi with audio to do so. Please click on the link, press the "play" button on the bottom left of the presentation screen, turn up your speakers, and then let me know how you like the format.
Have a great day!

Building Positive School Climates: Part I

In the U.S. Department of Education document, Guiding Principles: A Resource Guide for Improving School Climate and Discipline (2014), the first guiding principle that is outlined is entitled “Climate and Prevention.” Positive school climates are described as necessary to, “prevent problem behaviors before they occur and reduce the need for disciplinary interventions that can interfere with student learning” (USDE, 2014).

The document presents six action steps that schools should implement in order to boost academic excellence and student success.

Creating Effective Learning Environments

Last spring a group of individuals from across the state met to identify the best ways to support schools in the implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The group felt strongly that schools need to focus on the implementation of a multi-tiered system of supports (MTSS) in order to strategically meet the needs of all students. In addition, the group identified four components that need to be in place in order for schools to meet the challenge of preparing students to be college and career ready:
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How to Map Out a Project
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Autism Spectrum Disorders
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